Inside Science | August 25th, 2017

What the ‘Game of Thrones’ Dragons Might Really Look Like, According to Science

Last week’s “Game of Thrones” episode ended with a chilling image: massive, gnarled eyelids sliding open, revealing a dragon’s slit-pupiled gaze. But if dragons were real, their pupils would probably be round, not slitted, according to vision scientist Martin Banks at the University of California, Berkeley. Inside Science spoke with Banks and several other biologists […]

Daily Cal | August 24th, 2017

UC Berkeley study finds that more education leads to better cognitive function later in life

A study led by campus researchers found that higher levels of education are linked to later ages of peak cognitive performance. The study, published in PLOS ONE on Wednesday, was conducted by campus psychology professor Dr. Silvia Bunge, graduate psychology student Belén Guerra-Carrillo and General Assembly Space statistician Kiefer Katovich. According to Bunge, the group had long been aware of […]

Berkeley News | August 23rd, 2017

More education linked to better cognitive functioning later in life

Higher levels of education are tied to later ages of peak cognitive functioning, according to new research published today in the journal PLoS One. The study, led by UC Berkeley researchers, examined relationships between educational attainment, cognitive performance and learning in order to quantify the cumulative effect of attending school. Its findings suggest that higher levels […]

Psychology Today | August 9th, 2017

How Children’s Brains Learn to Reason

Reasoning is hard cognitive work. It’s what allows you to understand that if A is greater than B and B is greater than C, then A is greater than C. It lets you fill in the blank: a link is to a chain as a ­­­­­_____ is to a bouquet. (Answer: Flower, because the relationship is part […]

Healthline News | August 6th, 2017

The Latest in Brain Technology

We are now well on the way to being able to restore vision and hearing to people without those senses. Like the development of the internet, this change is happening in stages. Also, like the internet, the military’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is playing a leading role in the effort. “We’re building a […]

Neurofriends Podcast | August 3rd, 2017

Decoding

In Decoding, student host Ethan Cruikshank talks with Dr. Chris Holdgraf about open-brain surgery, how the brain interprets language, and whether “mind reading” is just around the corner (spoiler: not quite).

Berkeley College of Chemistry | August 1st, 2017

Evan Miller receives NeuroNex Innovation Award

Chemistry professor Evan Miller and his co-investigators are the recipients of the NeuroNex Innovation Award for research on Chemical and Genetic Methods to Measure and Manipulate Neurons with Light. This project will develop and apply new methods for non-invasively measuring electrical signals underlying brain cell communication. Understanding the human brain remains one of the great […]

The Washington Post | July 30th, 2017

Marian Diamond, neuroscientist who gave new meaning to ‘use it or lose it,’ dies at 90

Marian Diamond, a pathbreaking neuroscientist whose research — including a study of Albert Einstein’s preserved brain — showed that the body’s three-pound seat of consciousness was a dynamic structure of beautiful complexity, capable of development even in old age, died July 25 at an assisted-living community in Oakland, Calif. She was 90. A daughter, Ann […]

The New York Times | July 30th, 2017

Pioneering Researcher on the Brain’s ‘Plasticity’ Has Died

Marian Diamond, a neuroscientist who studied Albert Einstein’s brain and was the first to show that the brain’s anatomy can change with experience, has died. She was 90 Diamond, a professor of integrative biology at the University of California, Berkeley, died July 25 in Oakland, the university said Friday. Diamond became famous in 1984 when […]

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