Berkeley News | January 31, 2012

Scientists decode brain waves to eavesdrop on what we hear

Neuroscientists may one day be able to hear the imagined speech of a patient unable to speak due to stroke or paralysis, according to University of California, Berkeley, researchers. These scientists have succeeded in decoding electrical activity in the brain’s temporal lobe – the seat of the auditory system – as a person listens to […]

Berkeley News | December 7, 2011

Research could help people with declining sense of smell

University of California, Berkeley, neuroscientists have discovered a genetic trigger that makes the nose renew its smell sensors, providing hope for new therapies for people who have lost their sense of smell due to trauma or old age. The gene tells olfactory stem cells ‑ the adult tissue stem cells in the nose ‑ to […]

Berkeley News | October 30, 2011

Findings offer new clues into the addicted brain

What drives addicts to repeatedly choose drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, overeating, gambling or kleptomania, despite the risks involved? Neuroscientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have pinpointed the exact locations in the brain where calculations are made that can result in addictive and compulsive behavior. UC Berkeley researchers have found how neural activity in the brain’s […]

Berkeley News | August 31, 2011

Playing video games helps adults with lazy eye

Here are some words that few would have thought to put together: video game therapy. Yet, a pilot study by vision researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, has found that playing video games can help improve the vision of adults with amblyopia, or lazy eye. The study found that participants experienced marked improvement in […]

Berkeley News | June 14, 2011

New neurons help us to remember fear

Fear burns memories into our brain, and new research by University of California, Berkeley, neuroscientists explains how. Scientists have long known that fear and other highly emotional experiences lead to incredibly strong memories. In a study appearing online today (Tuesday, June 14) in advance of publication in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, UC Berkeley’s Daniela Kaufer […]

Berkeley News | March 24, 2011

UC Berkeley, UCSF join forces to advance frontier of brain repair

Neuroscientists and engineers at UC Berkeley and UCSF have joined forces to help pioneer a new frontier of brain repair – the development of devices that would allow patients with such conditions as stroke, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury and Lou Gehrig’s disease to control prosthetics through thoughts alone. Under the newly launched Center […]

Berkeley News | January 5, 2011

Advance makes MRI scans more than seven times faster

An international team of physicists and neuroscientists has reported a breakthrough in magnetic resonance imaging that allows brain scans more than seven times faster than currently possible. In a paper that appeared Dec. 20 in the journal PLoS ONE, a University of California, Berkeley, physicist and colleagues from the University of Minnesota and Oxford University […]

Berkeley News | November 24, 2010

Jet lagged and forgetful? It’s no coincidence

Chronic jet lag alters the brain in ways that cause memory and learning problems long after one’s return to a regular 24-hour schedule, according to research by University of California, Berkeley, psychologists. Twice a week for four weeks, the researchers subjected female Syrian hamsters to six-hour time shifts – the equivalent of a New York-to-Paris […]

Berkeley News | September 20, 2010

For neurons to work as a team, it helps to have a beat

When it comes to conducting complex tasks, it turns out that the brain needs rhythm, according to researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. Specifically, cortical rhythms, or oscillations, can effectively rally groups of neurons in widely dispersed regions of the brain to engage in coordinated activity, much like a conductor will summon up various […]

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